Example: Margaret Hall, Sagami Women’s University

Asahi Glass’s proud advanced technology is being adopted for various uses.

Glass technology which maximizes a soft natural light<Margaret Hall, built in commemoration of the 100-year anniversary of the foundation of Sagami Women’s University>

Glass technology which maximizes a soft natural light
<Margaret Hall, built in commemoration of the 100-year anniversary of the foundation of Sagami Women’s University>

Margaret Hall, which was built in commemoration of the 100-year anniversary of the foundation of Sagami Women’s University, is also one of the buildings supported by Asahi Glass’s technology. To invite a bright and soft natural light into the building, most of the exterior surfaces of the building are covered with glass. A clean and comfortable space is created by utilizing natural light effectively in various parts of the building, including the stairs, the elevator lobbies, an area providing employment information for students, and the atrium cafeteria extending across the 2nd and the 3rd floors.

Functional glass is essential for the creation of a light-filled space

Functional glass is essential for the creation of a light-filled space

Our insulating glass, Low-E Pairglass, has a specially coated metal on the warm side, so that heat transmission caused by thermal radiation between a pair of glass panes can be reduced, and a highly effective heat barrier can be provided.

For the construction of modern buildings with the abundant use of glass, the control of "incoming and outgoing heat" is most important. Buildings are designed as much as possible so as not to transmit the outside temperature to interior spaces. This is an essential element to keep the room temperature appropriate. People cannot stay in buildings comfortably if it is hot in summer, or cold in winter. However, heat transmits most easily through glass. Therefore, heat tends to transmit more intensely through buildings with more glass. In the case of residences, it is said that 48% of the heat that leaks to the outside is through window glass in winter when heaters are used, and, in summer, 71% of the heat leaks into houses through window glass. Considering that so much heat transmits through windows in residences, one must think that a higher percentage of heat transmits through windows in commercial buildings with glass enclosures. In addition, the impact of "emissive heat" is an element one must keep in mind. Because of the impact of emissive heat, people feel hot near window glass with a high surface temperature in summer, or feel cold near window glass with a low surface temperature in winter. In other words, even if a comfortable temperature is kept indoors, emissive heat has a great effect on comfort. How can we solve these problems when abundant glass is used? Asahi Glass’s technology is useful to solve such problems.

Asahi Glass’s glass materials that can control incoming and outgoing heat, and thermal radiation

Asahi Glass’s glass materials that can control incoming and outgoing heat, and thermal radiation

The amount of CO2 reduced through the use of high-performance glass products exceeds that of CO2 emitted during the manufacture of high-performance glass.

For Margaret Hall, high thermal insulation Low-E Pairglass "Sunbalance," which was developed by Asahi Glass, is used. Sunbalance has an "air space" between two sheets of glass, and a special clear metal is coated on the inside of the outer sheet of glass. This "air space" controls the movement of emissive heat, and brings about highly effective thermal insulation, and the "special metallic coating" allows the penetration of only visible light, reflects heat (infrared radiation) and ultraviolet radiation, curbs incoming and outgoing heat, and provides a highly effective heat barrier. Because the coating blocks ultraviolet radiation, it makes it possible to invite natural light that is also gentle for the skin.

Implementation of energy saving through effective thermal barrier and insulation

Window glass with more effective heat barriers and thermal insulation enhances the efficiency of air conditioning. This contributes to environmental conservation through energy saving. In 2003, Margaret Hall, where "Sunbalance" was used, received the 44th BCS Prize sponsored by the Building Contractors Society. The prize is awarded every year in order to contribute to the creation of excellent architectural assets, and the development of culture in Japan, and also to global environmental conservation. In addition, Sunbalance is about 35% more effective throughout the year in reducing carbon dioxide emitted from air-conditioners used in individual houses in Tokyo, than general single glass. Sunbalance also complies with the Next-Generation Energy-Saving Standards, which were established in order to reduce energy consumption of air-conditioners by about 20%. In Japan and other developed countries, low-emissivity insulating glass as typified by Sunbalance has been rapidly spreading because of increasing concern over the environment. In line with the worldwide trend, Asahi Glass not only reduces environmental burdens during manufacturing, but would like to contribute to the reduction of environmental burdens after shipping our products.

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